UK paperback preview for September

Can you imagine the summer holidays over, going back to school and college, and (for those in the Northern Hemisphere) the nights drawing in? Hard to contemplate in May, when (apart from a couple of blistering days last weekend), summer hasn't even started yet. Nevertheless, the Bookseller (28 May) is urging its readers (booksellers in the main, I presume, as well as a few hangers-on like me) of the delights in store 
Rupturefor their stock in September. Here are a few of my picks that will either warm you up, chill you down, or otherwise distract you from the end of the vacation:

Rupture by Simon Lelic (Picador). This one is simply a must-read – I called it "a Lord of the Flies for a new generation" in my review. The Bookseller says: "It's been some time since I picked up a first novel and literally couldn't put it down …."brilliant". If you don't believe me or the Bookseller, you can check out reviews by Crime Fiction Reader (It's a Crime), Bernadette (Reactions to Reading) and Kim (Reading Matters). This book is also known as A Thousand Cuts in some regions.

American Devil by Oliver Stark (Headline) comes highly recommended by Ben (Material Witness) and Elaine (Random Jottings). The Bookseller says " a UK author with a US setting (think Lee Child) and begins a series with New York police detectives Harper and Levene. I have a copy on my shelf courtesy of the publisher, so must prioritise!

Other quick mentions: She Lover of Death by Boris Akunin (Phoenix) – eighth in a series in which Fandorin assumes the alias of a Japanese prince to penetrate a Moscow secret society (historical); A Game of Sorrows by Shona MacLean (Quercus) -" a deeply absorbing book illustrating the horror and injustice of British rule in Ulster bound round a rich tale of Fitzgerald and murder" (historical); The Dark End of the Street, ed Santiofer and Rozan (Bloomsbury) – new short fiction on sex and crime from McDermid, Child, Connelly and others; A Bouquet of Barbed Wire by Andrea Newman (Serpent's Tail) – a reissue of this steamy 1970s family secrets novel; This Perfect World by Suzanne Bulger (Pan) – a 
 bullied victim's mother calls on her tormentors to help her daughter following a mental breakdown; The Disappeared by M, J. Hall (Pan) –  second outing for coroner Jenny Cooper; Bloody Women by Helen Fitzgerald (Polygon) – highly recommended tale about a girl imprisoned for killing her four ex-boyfriends. (Having read two of this author's previous novels, I'm definitely going to give this one a go!). And, of course, very many others including Nine Dragons by Michael Connelly and 61 Hours by Lee Child among the predicted top sellers.

7 thoughts on “UK paperback preview for September

  1. I have a feeling I´d better drop the rest of my blog round today. I have added so many books to my wish list already that I´d better start reading some of those I already have.
    I am reading my first Faroese crime novel ever (in Danish), and apart from the lovely environment the plot and the protagonist are also fairly intriguing. We visited the islands in 1994 which makes it a special treat to read the book.

  2. Oh, my gosh, so many more books, can’t keep up, will add to the list.

  3. Thanks Maxine—I don’t normally take to historical fiction-
    but Shona Maclean has a PHD–in the historical period she writes
    about and having an uncle in Alistair MacLean -adds ‘thriller’
    to fascinating historical re-construction.
    Taking up Dorte H’s comments–The only Faroese novel–that I have read
    – translated into English -is the splendid ‘Under Southern Stars’
    by Gunnar Hoydal-published 2003 by Mare’s Nest –and very well worth
    reading.

  4. I am not a big fan of historical fiction, either, Simon – but there are some very good reviews of the first of this series (so far of 2) – The Redemption of….. I had missed the fact that her uncle is (was) Alistair MacLean – an extra good mark! Now I am going to see if I can track down that Hoydal book! (I wonder if this is the same one that you are reading, Dorte.)

  5. No, this one is written by Jogvan Isakson, and I don´t think it is translated into English. He might stand a chance, though, especially as many crime lovers seem to favour remote islands😀

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