International Dagger update and judges revealed!

Dragon The Crime Writers Association (CWA) has updated its website in anticipation of the Dagger awards for 2010. It is quite hard to find this, but the trick is to go to the "rules" page, which encourages publishers to submit eligible books for each category of award, and scroll down. The category that interests me the most, as it will be no surprise to know, is the International Dagger – which you'll see on the tabs along the bottom of the rules page. I am doing my best to read the eligible titles, in the hope of having some good knowledge of the eventual shortlist, which will be announced at Crime Fest (the 2010 programme is now up at the festival's website).  

Shortlist announcement
On 21st May, 2010 the shortlist will be announced at CrimeFest at a special party hosted by the organisers. To facilitate this, the submission dates have altered slightly so please be aware of the earlier closing date of March 12th, 2010.

What jumps out at me, however, is the pre-eminence of the judging panel. Here it is:

JUDGING PANEL

Chair: Ann Cleeves
Karen Meek
John Murray-Browne
Ruth Morse

Yes, that's Karen! Congratulations to Karen on being selected as a judge. I feel so honoured to know such a renowned person. And naturally, I am looking forward to the shortlist announcement with even keener interest than before.

Previous posts about my attempts to read the books eligible for the 2010 International Dagger:

1 December 2009. I've read 9 of the possible 61 novels, and provide links to my reviews of 8 of these.

16 January 2010. I've read Death in Oslo and The Woman from Bratislava.

13 February 2010. Progress report.

15 February 2010. A review of Thursday Night Widows, one more on the list.

4 March 2010. I've read Thirteen Hours and have started on At Close Quarters.

This brings my grand total up to FIFTEEN (so far – about a quarter of the list):

Mikkel Birkegaard – The Library of Shadows
Andrea Camilleri – August Heat
Leif Davidsen – The Woman from Bratislava
Karin Fossum – The Water's Edge
Petra Hammesfahr – The Lie
Anne Holt – Death in Oslo
Arnaldur Indridason – Hypothermia
Camilla Lackberg – The Stonecutter
Stieg Larsson – The Girl Who Kicked the Hornets' Nest
Deon Meyer – Thirteen Hours
Jo Nesbo – The Snowman
Claudia Pineiro – Thursday Night Widows
Andrea Maria Schenkel – Ice Cold
Gunnar Staalesen – The Consorts of Death
Johan Theorin – The Darkest Room

10 thoughts on “International Dagger update and judges revealed!

  1. Well done , Karen! I totally disagreed with last year’s winner, but with Karen judging I don’t think that will a problem this year.

  2. Excellent for Karen!
    Of the 21 –I have now read on the list-
    I have just finished The Snowman–Jo Nesbo-
    quite superb—and my choice for the winner-by
    a distance.

  3. That’s impressive — on two counts: (1) Karen being on the judging panel (well deserved!) and (2) the number of books you’ve read off the longlist! Are you planning on predicting a shortlist? Any particular title jump out at you as a real contender for the main prize?

  4. Thank you for the kind words (Maxine – I am honoured to know the editor of Nature magazine :)). I’ve been quite embarrassed at being chosen. Quite a lot of the “eligible titles” have only just come out so I’ll be fairly quiet for the next few weeks!

  5. So far on my list of 15 I would make a shortlist of
    Andrea Camilleri – August Heat
    Leif Davidsen – The Woman from Bratislava
    Karin Fossum – The Water’s Edge
    Arnaldur Indridason – Hypothermia
    Stieg Larsson – The Girl Who Kicked the Hornets’ Nest
    Deon Meyer – Thirteen Hours
    Jo Nesbo – The Snowman
    Claudia Pineiro – Thursday Night Widows
    Gunnar Staalesen – The Consorts of Death
    Johan Theorin – The Darkest Room
    So, it is just as well I am not one of the judges! (I don’t know how long the short list is – about 6 I think).
    It is very hard to identify a main contender as many of the books are so different in scope, trying to achieve different things….The Woman from Bratislava, for example, is an ambitious, complex novel covering historical and polictical themes across mainland Europe from WW2 to the present, whereas Thursday Night Widows is a social satire based on an upmarket “country club” in Argentina. Several of them are traditional detective novels or thrillers. I find it very hard to rank them for this reason.
    Karen, not quite “the” editorđŸ˜‰

  6. Yes-Maxine.I think you have clearly indicated-
    what a difficult job -Karen and her colleagues have-
    and also what a rich and varied selection are
    under consideration.

  7. I’m reading The Library of Shadows, by Mikkel Birkegaard, at the moment. It’s rather good but I can’t see it winning a Dagger – it’s more like Danish magic realism than Mankell or Larsson, and would definitely appeal to anyone who enjoyed Carlos Ruiz Zafon.

  8. I have read The Library of Shadows but it was not my cup of tea. It started well, I thought, but once we got onto the magic I am afraid I parted company with it, though I did read on to the end. (Review submitted to Euro Crime.) I agree it does not (to me) fall into Dagger territory.

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