Our friends in the North (well, New York)

Via Jenny Davidson of Light Reading, I discover that there has been a literary debate at Columbia University: as reported by my fellow "If"-admirer, Ed Champion, Sven "Birkerts had come into town for a debate with Jenny Davidson, moderated by Andrew Delbanco, styled Blogging: Good or Bad for Literary Culture?“I can’t tell if we’re positioned at odds,” whispered Birkerts to Davidson before the proceedings started, a foreshadowing of the stalemate to come."
Well, as Jenny puts it in her post drawing attention to the debate: "I must confess that I feel I am having excessive home-court advantage, in that anybody who writes a blog post on this topic is presumably mildly to moderately strongly pro-blogging!"
Ed's post is well worth a read. Here's an excerpt of the perfectly articulated opinion of Prof Davidson:
"By far, the most reasonable participant was Davidson, who advocated blogging, but pointed out that blogging could not directly replace newspaper criticism. She pointed to both the constraints of word count within newspapers, and simultaneously observed that there were certain advantages of concision within the short-format blog post."
However, I couldn't agree more with Ed's conclusion: "It has become evident that the biggest problem with this “debate” is the surfeit of stubborn souls unwilling to consider the alternative form, whether it’s the blogger who refuses to consider the virtues of editing or thinking through his post a bit or the print advocate so terrified of anarchic fun that he cannot find it within himself to trust his instinct from time to time. I’d like to think that this can be bridged."
One way to bridge it, I suppose, is to have a foot in both camps, as an increasingly greater number of people are doing.