Coffee break at Librarian’s place

My friendly OWL has drawn my attention to a lovely article by Michael Blowhard about the history of coffee shops. It is posted over at Librarian’s Place. And while you are there, scroll down, as some of the articles there are sure to catch your interest. The underground grammarian, the mystery of the wire loop, Lulu does it differently, libraries’ missing millions — a wonderful browse.

5 thoughts on “Coffee break at Librarian’s place

  1. Thanks for the heads-up on the cofeehouses post. It’s an interesting article, but perhaps stronger on history than on the contemporary scene. I think analogies between coffeehouses and the Web are overblown. I mean, I am conversing as I type this post, but I am not exactly engaging in a social activity. Perhaps a better analogy with the Web and blogging would be something I read a few years ago about life in Manhattan. There, the writer said, people build and carry out friendships by telephone while hardly ever seeing their friends in person.
    And today coffeehouses continue to provide a valuable place for people to gather, socialize and, um, talk on their cell phones and type on their laptops.
    ========================
    Detectives Beyond Borders
    “Because Murder is More Fun Away From Home”
    http://detectivesbeyondborders.blogspot.com/

  2. Yes, I see what you mean, Peter — not quite the same as going out for a Friday night drink with colleagues after work.
    And what’s more, Clare in her comment over at Librarian’s Place picked up on the fact that they didn’t let women in, thus no doubt reducing quite considerably the liveliness and intellectual repartee component 😉

  3. I think someone also said something about coffeehouses being particular to England and salons to France. I could be wrong, but I think coffeehouses were popular in Paris around the time they were big in England.
    My preferred place to hang out is a used bookstore/cafe — the best of all possible worlds. If I had to choose one of the great hanging-out spots, though — American coffeehouse, English pub or Chinese teahouse — off my brief experience, I’d choose one of the latter two, depending if I were feeling convivial or contemplative.
    By the way, if you’re fascinated by coffee, I can second the Crime Scraps recommendation for The Coffee Trader by David Liss.
    ========================
    Detectives Beyond Borders
    “Because Murder is More Fun Away From Home”
    http://detectivesbeyondborders.blogspot.com/

  4. I think someone also said something about coffeehouses being particular to England and salons to France. I could be wrong, but I think coffeehouses were popular in Paris around the time they were big in England.
    My preferred place to hang out is a used bookstore/cafe — the best of all possible worlds. If I had to choose one of the great hanging-out spots, though — American coffeehouse, English pub or Chinese teahouse — off my brief experience, I’d choose one of the latter two, depending if I were feeling convivial or contemplative.
    By the way, if you’re fascinated by coffee, I can second the Crime Scraps recommendation for The Coffee Trader by David Liss.
    ========================
    Detectives Beyond Borders
    “Because Murder is More Fun Away From Home”
    http://detectivesbeyondborders.blogspot.com/

  5. I haven’t actually “hung out” anywhere for 15 years (that’s the age of my elder daughter) — for me it is just work, home or the commute in the middle.
    I will check out the Liss recommendation at crime scraps so I can participate virtually, at least. Thanks for the comments, Peter.

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